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Jewellery has been around for thousands of years. It can be seen in many different cultures and throughout time periods, but the history is not as simple as it may seem. There are several stories and legends that have to do with jewellery, including a few interesting facts about some famous pieces of jewellery. In this blog post we’ll go through a brief summary of the history of jewellery, so you will know how to wear your piece with pride!

 

*Jewellery was first seen in Mesopotamia, where beads were used to create necklaces. The Egyptians also created jewellery and the examples found have been dated from around 1500 BC until 50 AD.*

 

-In Ancient Greece, simple gold ornaments became more sophisticated after Phoenician traders began travelling there on a regular basis. They brought new ideas with them such as citrinin gemstones that they had discovered in Jerusalem.-

 

-The Romans borrowed heavily from Greek culture when it came to jewellery. Goldsmiths would make intricate pieces of work for both men and women who could afford their services. Diamonds are actually not very expensive – many people DO NOT know this! Diamond prices weren’t expensive until the 18th century, when they became a symbol of power and wealth.

*Research to be confirmed: date jewellery created in Egypt between 1500 BC – 50 AD?

 

The Egyptians also created jewellery and the examples found have been dated from around 1500 BC until 50 AD.* In Ancient Greece, simple gold ornaments became more sophisticated after Phoenician traders began travelling there on a regular basis. They brought new ideas with them such as citrinin gemstones that they had discovered in Jerusalem.- The Romans borrowed heavily from Greek culture when it came to jewellery. Goldsmiths would make intricate pieces of work for both men and women who could afford their services. Diamonds are actually not very expensive – many people DO NOT know.

 

The Egyptians believed that jewellery was the physical representation of their worship towards gods.

*The Egyptians also created jewellery and the examples found have been dated from around 1500 BC until 50 AD.* In Ancient Greece, simple gold ornaments became more sophisticated after Phoenician traders began travelling there on a regular basis. They brought new ideas with them such as citrinin gemstones that they had discovered in Jerusalem.- The Romans borrowed heavily from Greek culture when it came to jewellery. Goldsmiths would make intricate pieces of work for both men and women who could afford their services. Diamonds are actually not very expensive – many people don not know.

 

The Greeks and Romans had no qualms with adorning themselves in jewellery. It was a symbol of status and wealth at the time. The Greeks wore earrings to signify their rank, while among Roman women there’s evidence that gold necklaces were worn as indicators of rank within society.

*The Egyptians also created jewellery and the examples found have been dated from around 1500 BC until 50 AD.* In Ancient Greece, simple gold ornaments became more sophisticated after Phoenician traders began travelling there on a regular basis. They brought new ideas with them such as citrinin gemstones that they had discovered in Jerusalem.- The Romans borrowed heavily from Greek culture when it came to jewellery. Goldsmiths would make intricate pieces of work for both types of nobility. But, there are few examples of jewellery from the Roman Empire that have been found because it was expensive to make and many pieces were melted down in order to create coins.*In China during the Han dynasty (206BC-220AD), pearls became a key material for fashioning rings as well as necklaces and hairpins.*

*The Byzantine empire saw an explosion of jewellery production with around 79% of all goldsmiths living within its borders making items like earrings, pendants, brooches and bracelets out of gold or silver threads.- The only way these craftsmen could continue their trade was by passing on their skills through apprenticeships. This is how they managed to maintain such high quality work throughout decades as they were often under pressure from the Byzantine emperor to produce items for ceremonial use.

*The Ottoman Empire was famous for its production of gemstones and so many exquisite pieces were created that we have a record of them being traded as far away as China, Persia (now Iran) and even India.*In medieval Europe it is thought that most people wore jewellery only on special occasions such as holidays or weddings with some other common forms including pendants containing images like saints, crucifixes or religious symbols.

– In contrast in ancient Greece adornment was much more commonplace but still largely reserved for wealthier classes who could afford expensive materials like gold and precious stones.- Softer metals such as silver would be used by poorer folk while copper may show up in archaeological.

 

The Crusades saw the introduction of Western styles such as crosses and Christian-themed jewellery to the east while at home, wealthy Europeans in the Victorian era were being buried with their best jewels.

*In medieval Europe it is thought that most people wore jewellery only on special occasions such as holidays or weddings with some other common forms including pendants containing images like saints, crucifixes or religious symbols.

– In contrast in ancient Greece adornment was much more commonplace but still largely reserved for wealthier classes who could afford expensive materials like gold and precious stones.- Softer metals such as silver would be used by poorer folk while copper may show up in archaeological.

The Crusades saw the introduction of Western styles such as crosses and Christian-themed jewellery to the east. which was heavily influenced by the Byzantine Empire

In the Renaissance Era, jewellery was more elaborate as people wanted to show off their wealth.

– Simple pieces made of silver were worn in Italy while outerwear became popular with necklaces and brooches displaying family crests or symbols like roses for love.- Jewels from India also began to make an appearance during this time period such a turquoise stones which match well with gold..

–The Victorian era saw it become fashionable to wear multiple layers of jewellery on one outfit at once. This included long strings of pearls around necks and diamond studs on earrings.–Women who could afford them would often put together different outfits that displayed different combinations so they could change up their look.